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Daily Archives: 09/01/2011

(Democracy Now!)
From Wall Street to the White House: Obama Taps JPMorgan Exec William Daley for Chief of Staff

President Obama appointed William Daley, a top financial executive and former Clinton administration official, as his new White House chief of staff. Daley is the Midwest chair of JPMorgan Chase, a board member of Merck, and former head of SBC. Obama will also reportedly name former Goldman Sachs consultant Gene Sperling to head the National Economic Council. We speak with Ari Berman of The Nation magazine.
Watch video and read more… [includes rush transcript]

(bbc.co.uk) The number of people killed in unrest over unemployment in Tunisia over the past 24 hours has risen to 14, officials say.

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Tunisia’s official news agency Tap said five people had died as a result of overnight clashes in the western town of Thala, and five were killed in violence in nearby Kasserine.

“Several government buildings in Kasserine were attacked by groups who set fire to and destroyed three banks, a police station and a filling station and set fire to a police vehicle,” the statement said.

Read more…

(infoshop.org) In June 1972 workers at the Broadmeadows Ford Factory exploded smashing up their workplace, facing off police and forcing union bosses into endorsing a strike they had attempted to abandon. The dispute was only one of the hundreds that tore across Australia that year, but was remarkable for the strikers ability to circumvent official control, gain widespread community support and push the needs of migrant workers onto the national agenda. Read more…

(topdocumentaryfilms.com) Imagine a home that heats itself, that provides its own water, hat grows its own food. Imagine that it needs no expensive technology, that it recycles its own waste, that it has its own power source.

And now imagine that it can be built anywhere, by anyone, out of the things society throws away. Thirty years ago, architect Michael Reynolds imagined just such a home – then set out to build it.

A visionary in the classic American mode, Reynolds has been fighting ever since to bring his concept to the public. He believes that in an age of ecological instability and impending natural disaster, his buildings can – and will – change the way we live.

Shot over three years in the USA, India and Mexico, Garbage Warrior is a feature-length documentary film telling the epic story of maverick architect Michael Reynolds, his crew of renegade house builders from New Mexico, and their fight to introduce radically different ways of living.

A snapshot of contemporary geo-politics and an inspirational tale of triumph over bureaucracy, Garbage Warrior is above all an intimate portrait of an extraordinary individual and his dream of changing the world.

(Democracy Now!) In states across the country, elected officials and right-wing pundits are calling not just for cuts to wages and benefits in the name of austerity, but even proposing laws to undermine labor unions’ influence, and in fact, their very existence. We host a roundtable discussion with New York Times labor reporter Steven Greenhouse; Michael Zweig of the Center for Study of Working Class Life; and Art Levine of the Washington Monthly.

Watch video and read more… [includes rush transcript]

(Democracy Now!) Protests are planned at the White House next week to mark the ninth anniversary of the first transfer of foreign prisoners to the U.S. military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. Meanwhile, the Center for Constitutional Rights filed a request Thursday asking a Spanish court to subpoena the former commanding officer at Guantánamo Bay, Major General Geoffrey Miller, over the alleged torture of four Guantánamo prisoners. Last month, CCR also asked another Spanish judge to prosecute six former Bush administration officials who authored the legal memos authorizing the torture of foreign prisoners. Read more and watch video… [includes rush transcript]

(anarchistnews.org) Clashes continued in Keretea outside Athens on Wednesday. Local residents do not want the government to build a large waste disposal site in their town. The Greek government is obliged to build this dump according to EU regulations. Residents have been struggling against the riot police that have been occupying the town for weeks.

On Wednesday, clashes took place on the highway, in the city, and in front of the local police station. Residents from the town with a population of 11,000 are largely in opposition to not only the waste site, but to the presence of the police, which they view as an occupying force.

An appeal by residents of Keratea against the planned construction of a landfill in the district, is to be heard on February 2, a local court ruled yesterday. Until then, all planned construction work is forbidden, the court said.

This is an example of a local struggle that is unifying the town, from Orthodox Christians to hooligans, from parents to anarchists.

(fuckcopyright) “Solidarity all for one and one for all!”. With that slogan the Industrial Workers of the World aka the Wobblies took to organizing unskilled workers into one big union and winning and eight-hour workday and fair wages. Along the way the Wobblies met with imprisonment violence and the privation of prolonged strikes. This award-winning film airs a provocative look at the forgotten American history of this most radical of unions paying tribute to workers who took the ideals of equality and free speech seriously enough to die for them. Stewart Bird and Deborah Shaffer directed the film. …

(Critical Theory Library) A vibrant history in graphic art of the “Wobblies,” published for the centenary of the founding of the Industrial Workers of the World and promoted by a major US tour.
The stories of the hard-rock miners’ shooting wars, young Elizabeth Gurly Flynn (the “Rebel Girl” of contemporary sheet music), the first sit-down strikes and Free Speech fights, Emma Goldman and the struggle for birth control access, the Pageant for Paterson orchestrated in Madison Square Garden, bohemian radicals John Reed and Louise Bryant, field-hand revolts and lumber workers’ strikes, wartime witch hunts, government prosecutions and mob lynching, Mexican-American uprisings in Baja, and Mexican peasant revolts led by Wobblies, hilarious and sentimental songs created and later revived—all are here, and much, much more. Read more…

(guardian.co.uk) Since WikiLeaks released the US embassy cables on 28 November 2009 it has come under pressure on several fronts, from DDoS attacks to frozen bank accounts. We list the companies, politicians and organisations making life difficult for WikiLeaks and Julian Assange

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Wednesday 15 December 2010

• TECH: The US air force blocks employees from accessing the websites of the Guardian, the New York Times and other news organisations carrying the WikiLeaks US embassy cables. At least 25 sites that have posted WikiLeaks files are barred. The Wall Street Journal reports that staff who attempt to access the blocked sites instead see the on-screen message “Access denied. Internet usage is logged and monitored.”

Tuesday 21 December 2010

• TECH: Apple removes an unofficial WikiLeaks app from sale in the iTunes App Store just five days after it went live. WikiLeaks App launched on 17 December – meaning Apple would have approved it – offering access to the site’s leaked documents and the latest updates from the official WikiLeaks Twitter account. It automatically forwards to mirrored WikiLeaks content and gives full access to CableGate information.

Saturday January 8 2011

• LEGAL: It emerges that the US justice department has obtained a court subpoena demanding that Twitter hand over all details of the accounts and private messages of five WikiLeaks supporters and members. They include the WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange; Bradley Manning, the alleged army leaker; the Icelandic MP Brigitta Jonsdottir; and the Dutch hacker Rop Gonggrijp. The writ, approved by a court in Virginia in December, covers information including the computers and networks used by the group to communicate. Full article…