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Daily Archives: 14/02/2011

(eagainst) V for Vendetta is a 2006 dystopian thriller film directed by James McTeigue and produced by Joel Silver and the Wachowski brothers, who also wrote the screenplay. It is an adaptation of the comic book series of the same name by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. Set in London in a near-future dystopian society, Natalie Portman stars as Evey, a working-class girl who must determine if her hero has become the very menace she is fighting against. Hugo Weaving plays V—a bold, charismatic freedom fighter driven to exact revenge on those who disfigured him. Stephen Rea portrays the detective leading a desperate quest to capture V before he ignites a revolution.  The film was originally scheduled for release by Warner Bros. Friday, November 4, 2005 (a day before the 400th Guy Fawkes Night), but was delayed; it opened on March 17, 2006. Reviews were mixed, but the worldwide box office earnings were over $132 million. Alan Moore, having been disappointed with the film adaptations of two of his other graphic novels, From Hell and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, refused to view the film and subsequently distanced himself from it. The filmmakers removed many of the anarchist themes and drug references present in the original story and also altered the political message to what they believed would be more relevant to a 2006 audience.
Watch it here…

Source: http://eagainst.com/articles/v-for-vendetta/

(hrw.org) In April 2009, the Chinese government unveiled its first-ever National Human Rights Action Plan (2009-2010), in which it recommitted to existing human rights protections in domestic and international law. However, at the same time the Chinese government has touted its commitment to human rights through this document, it has also continued to egregiously violate those obligations, most notably through its persecution of 2010 Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo. An overview of the deterioration in China’s overall human rights environment. Watch photos and read more…

(The Telegraph) Hosni Mubarak used the 18 days it took for protesters to topple him to shift his vast wealth into untraceable accounts overseas, Western intelligence sources have said.

By Philip Sherwell, in New York, Robert Mendick, and Nick Meo in Cairo 8:26PM GMT 12 Feb 2011

The former Egyptian president is accused of amassing a fortune of more than £3 billion – although some suggest it could be as much as £40 billion – during his 30 years in power. It is claimed his wealth was tied up in foreign banks, investments, bullion and properties in London, New York, Paris and Beverly Hills.

In the knowledge his downfall was imminent, Mr Mubarak is understood to have attempted to place his assets out of reach of potential investigators. Read More

(angry news from around the world) from the greek streets

Saturday, February 12, 2011 – The local branch of the supermarket DIA in the NW city of Igoumenitsa has banned migrants from entering its premises completely, after a period of time in which they were only allowed to enter the store one at a time. In response, anarchists in Athens attacked four branches of DIA in the city (in Agios Eleftherios, Petralona, Patisia and Kipseli). Their storefronts were smashed, paint was thrown along with leaflets explaining the action.

Source: http://sysiphus-angrynewsfromaroundtheworld.blogspot.com/2011/02/igoumenitsa-nw-greece-super-market.html