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(technoparadise.in) U.S. National Security Agency has developed and patented a new technique by which a computer network can be computed by hackers who try to impersonate legitimate users. At the heart of the NSA is developing software that accurately measures the time required to transfer over the network or that type of data from one computer to another.

In the event that the time required for transmission, dramatically increases or decreases, the software warns of atypical behavior of the computer that is located “on the other side” of the network.

In the NSA notice that earlier time technique is proposed for use by other researchers, but their technique is different from anything proposed so far. The new technology involves sending different types of data, comparing the speed and the nodes on which they are in the process of its delivery to the destination node.

“The highlight of the method lies in the fact that he is looking at several network levels at once,” – says Tadaeshi Kono, one of the developers of the system and an employee of the University of Washington.
The developers say that their method allows to find phishing sites, as well as deal with common types of attack, man-in-the-middle, where the attacker transmits and listens to all traffic from the private client to the server via your computer.

IT expert Dan Kaminsky, who discovered a major bug in the DNS system this year, not particularly impressed with the development of American intelligence officers: “Just think, if your network has become a bit slower, or the bad guys fill her bad packets, this method is not very effective . In practice it might be a billion reasons why the routing can be slowed down. ”

While the NSA did not report whether they will publish a new development under the GPL, as it was in his time with SELinux.

Via: http://anonymouslegionops.blogspot.com/2012/03/u.html

( on Mar 23, 2012 It’s emerged that at the height of Japan’s nuclear crisis last March, the authorities in Fukushima concealed radiation data vital to safely evacuate people from that area. Japan has a computer system designed to predict the spread of radioactive releases. But local media reports say the prefecture’s government deleted the e-mails detailing it. RT talks to Asia Times correspondent Pepe Escobar.