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(guardian.co.uk) A suspected member of the clandestine hacking group LulzSec has been arrested in Arizona by the FBI on charges of taking part in an extensive breach of the Sony Pictures computer system.

A federal grand jury indictment charges Cody Kretsinger, 23, with conspiracy and the unauthorised impairment of a protected computer in connection with the attack in May and June.

LulzSec, an underground group also known as Lulz Security, at the time published the names, birth dates, addresses, emails, phone numbers and passwords of thousands of people who had entered contests promoted by Sony.

“From a single injection we accessed EVERYTHING,” the hacking group said in a statement at the time. “Why do you put such faith in a company that allows itself to become open to these simple attacks?”

Hackers previously had accessed personal information on 77m PlayStation Network and Qriocity accounts, 90% of which belonged to users in North America and Europe, in what was then the biggest such security breach in history.

The nine-page indictment said Kretsinger and co-conspirators obtained confidential information from Sony Pictures’ computer systems using an “SQL injection” attack against its website, a technique commonly used by hackers to exploit vulnerabilities and steal information.

Kretsinger, alleged to have called himself “recursion” online, helped post information he and his co-conspirators stole from Sony on LulzSec’s website and announced the intrusion via the hacking group’s Twitter account, the indictment said.

Read more: http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/sep/23/sony-lulzsec-hacking-arrest-fbi

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(newscientist.com) It was early May when LulzSec’s profile skyrocketed after a hack on the giant Sony corporation. LulzSec’s name comes from Lulz, a corruption of LOL, often denoting laughter at the victim of a prank. For 50 days until it disbanded, the group’s unique blend of humour, taunting and unapologetic data theft made it notorious. But knowing whether LulzSec was all about the “lulz” or if it owed more to its roots as part of Anonymous, the umbrella group of internet subculture and digital activism, was pure speculation. Until now.

Who is “Sabu”?

I’m a man who believes in human rights and exposing abuse and corruption. I generally care about people and their situations. I’m into politics and I try my best to stay on top of current events.

We’ve seen you cast as everything from the greatest of heroes to the most evil of villains. How would you characterise yourself?

It is hard for me to see myself as either. I am not trying to be a martyr. I’m not some cape-wearing hero, nor am I some supervillain trying to bring down the good guys. I’m just doing what I know how to do, and that is counter abuse.

What was your first experience with “hacktivism”?

I got involved about 11 years ago when the US navy was using Vieques Island in Puerto Rico as a bombing range for exercises. There were lots of protests going on and I got involved in supporting the Puerto Rican government by disrupting communications. This whole situation was the first of its kind for the island and the people didn’t expect things to go that route. Eventually, the US navy left Vieques.

How did you get involved with Anonymous?

When I found out about what happened to Julian Assange, his arrest in the UK and so on, I found it absolutely absurd. So I got involved with Anonymous at that point.

What operation really inspired you and why?

Earlier this year, we got wind of the Tunisians’ plight. Their government was blocking access to any website that reported anti-Tunisian information, including Tunileaks, the Tunisian version of Wikileaks, and any news sites discussing them.

Tunisians came to us telling us about their desire to resist. “Disrupt the government of Tunisia,” they said, and we did. We infiltrated the prime minister’s site and defaced it externally. When Tunisia filtered off its internet from the world, it was the Tunisians who came online using dial-up and literally allowed us to use their connections to tunnel through to re-deface the prime minister’s websites. It was the most impressive thing I’ve seen: a revolution coinciding both physically and online. It was the first time I had proof that what Anonymous was doing was real and it was working.

What would you like to say to people who say that you and other Antisec/Anonymous/LulzSec members are just troublemakers who have caused untold damage and loss to people for no apparent reason?

Read more: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20649-exclusive-first-interview-with-key-lulzsec-hacker.html?full=true

 

Friends around the globe,

We are Lulz Security, and this is our final release, as today marks something meaningful to us. 50 days ago, we set sail with our humble ship on an uneasy and brutal ocean: the Internet. The hate machine, the love machine, the machine powered by many machines. We are all part of it, helping it grow, and helping it grow on us.

For the past 50 days we’ve been disrupting and exposing corporations, governments, often the general population itself, and quite possibly everything in between, just because we could. All to selflessly entertain others – vanity, fame, recognition, all of these things are shadowed by our desire for that which we all love. The raw, uninterrupted, chaotic thrill of entertainment and anarchy. It’s what we all crave, even the seemingly lifeless politicians and emotionless, middle-aged self-titled failures. You are not failures. You have not blown away. You can get what you want and you are worth having it, believe in yourself.

While we are responsible for everything that The Lulz Boat is, we are not tied to this identity permanently. Behind this jolly visage of rainbows and top hats, we are people. People with a preference for music, a preference for food; we have varying taste in clothes and television, we are just like you. Even Hitler and Osama Bin Laden had these unique variations and style, and isn’t that interesting to know? The mediocre painter turned supervillain liked cats more than we did.

Again, behind the mask, behind the insanity and mayhem, we truly believe in the AntiSec movement. We believe in it so strongly that we brought it back, much to the dismay of those looking for more anarchic lulz. We hope, wish, even beg, that the movement manifests itself into a revolution that can continue on without us. The support we’ve gathered for it in such a short space of time is truly overwhelming, and not to mention humbling. Please don’t stop. Together, united, we can stomp down our common oppressors and imbue ourselves with the power and freedom we deserve.

So with those last thoughts, it’s time to say bon voyage. Our planned 50 day cruise has expired, and we must now sail into the distance, leaving behind – we hope – inspiration, fear, denial, happiness, approval, disapproval, mockery, embarrassment, thoughtfulness, jealousy, hate, even love. If anything, we hope we had a microscopic impact on someone, somewhere. Anywhere.

Thank you for sailing with us. The breeze is fresh and the sun is setting, so now we head for the horizon.

Let it flow…

Lulz Security – our crew of six wishes you a happy 2011, and a shout-out to all of our battlefleet members and supporters across the globe

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Our mayhem: http://lulzsecurity.com/releases/
Our chaos: http://thepiratebay.org/user/LulzSec/
Our final release: http://thepiratebay.org/torrent/6495523/50_Days_of_Lulz

Source: http://pastebin.com/1znEGmHa

(CENSORED NEWS) The hunting and murder of migrants by US Marines along the Arizona border was among the first facts revealed, after LulzSec hacked the Arizona Department of Public Safety on Thursday.
Describing the hacked data, boingboing.net, said, “There are countless mundane documents covering hours worked, officers’ personal information and other stuff of minimal journalistic interest. But the bulletins often offer fascinating stories of law enforcement encounters, such as this one with off-duty Marines patrolling the U.S.-Mexico border with assault weapons.” Read More

(guardian.co.uk) Investigators believe a teenager arrested at his family home in Essex may have been a “significant” figure in a computer hacking group alleged to have staged attacks against websites belonging to the US government, the electronics giant Sony, and an elite British crime unit.

Scotland Yard cybercrime detectives were questioning Ryan Cleary, 19, over the attacks carried out by the LulzSec group, which mostly targeted websites belonging to institutions and companies in the US.

The events leading to the arrest of Cleary involved an investigation by British police and the US Federal Bureau of Investigation. The FBI‘s involvement, plus the nature of the targets, raised the prospect that Washington may seek the teenager’s extradition to the US, just as it did in the case of UFO obsessive Gary McKinnon, a saga that is still ongoing.

LulzSec have attacked the websites of the CIA, the US senate, US broadcasters and, on Monday, the day of Cleary’s arrest, the hackers bought down the website of Britain’s Serious and Organised Crime Agency (Soca).

LulzSec is believed to have established itself as a formidable splinter group to Anonymous, the hacking group embroiled in the WikiLeaks fallout, with high-profile attacks on the Gawker website in December last year and a devastating assault on the US security firm HBGary in February.

Members of Anonymous claimed in emails to the Guardian that Cleary, though involved, was not the “mastermind” behind any hacking group. “He owned the server which LulzSec used to communicate using IRC [internet relay chat, a bit like instant messenger].”

UK records show that a company called Arcusvoice, which held domain names used to host websites, was registered to Cleary’s home address in Wickford, Essex.

“Ryan Cleary was not a mastermind hacker,” the email continued. “He could not keep his own personal information safe. He simply provided the means of communication, just like if two people send letters to each other, FedEx/Royal Mail/DHL are the providers of communication.”

Read More: http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/jun/21/hunt-hackers-us-government-essex-teenager